Oslo's top 10 attractions

Text: Anne Bloksgaard Nielsen Published 15.02.2021

Norway's capital, Oslo, is a bustling metropolis that has retained its close contact with the surrounding countryside and the country's fascinating history. Here is a list of Oslo's 10 most popular attractions.

Vigeland Park Sculpture Park
Vigelandsparken is one of Norway's most visited attractions – more than one million visitors visit the 80-hectare park in western Oslo every year Here you can see 212 sculptures in bronze, granite and cast iron by the Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland (1869-1943).
Opera House: nature and culture merge
Oslo's Opera House offers unique experiences both indoors and out. The Opera House hosts a wide range of world-class opera and ballet performances, and is a popular attraction in its own right: the building is open to the public, and it's especially popular to take a walk up to the roof to enjoy panoramic views of the city and fjord.
Holmenkollen: Ski jump, museum and viewpoint in one
The iconic Holmenkollen ski jump is three attractions in one place: the state-of-the-art ski jump is also home to the world's oldest ski museum, where you can discover more than 4,000 years of ski history, and the viewing platform at the top of the ski jump hill offers a unique panoramic view of the capital.
Centuries of history in the heart of the city
In the middle of Oslo, take a trip back in time to the impressive Akershus Fortress from the 13th century. Join a guided tour or explore on your own and enjoy the historic atmosphere and beautiful surroundings.
The world's best preserved Viking ships
If you want your holiday to include an exciting insight into the life of the Vikings in the 9th century, the Viking Ship Museum should be on your list of holiday destinations. Here you can see the world's two best-preserved Viking ships, as well as a wide range of boats, sleds, tools, harnesses and other Viking equipment.
The museum is closed until 2025/2026 due to renovations.
The National Gallery: Norwegian and international masterpieces in a class of their own
The Norwegian National Gallery has a large number of masterpieces in painting, drawing and sculpture. The main attractions are Edvard Munch's the Scream and Madonna, but large works by Cézanne and Manet also adorn the walls.
The youngest members of the family can enjoy a special art experience in the museum's Fairy Tale Room, where they can meet princesses, goblins and other fairytale creatures or try out their artistic skills in the studios.
Explore the world's plants and animals
In eastern Oslo is the Natural History Museum, which includes a botanical garden, zoological museum and a museum of mineralogy and geology. In the Botanical Gardens you can walk among more than 7,500 plant species, and in the Zoological Museum you can see animals from all over the world – and even the huge skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus Rex.
Fun and excitement for young and old
Some 20 kilometres south of Oslo is Norway's largest amusement park, TusenFryd. There are more than 30 rides, including Scandinavia's most spectacular roller coaster, SpeedMonster, thatgoes does 0–90 km/h in two seconds! The park also has plenty of rides for the little ones and a water park.

The world's most robust wooden ship: the polar ship Fram
At the Fram Museum you can get a unique insight into the life of a polar explorer. Come aboard the Fram and see how the crew and their dogs lived and survived in the coldest and most dangerous regions of the world over 100 years ago.
A journey back in time
The Norwegian Folk Museum is one of the world's oldest and largest open-air museums. Here you can explore 155 historic buildings from all over Norway and a stave church from 1200. Exhibitions include traditional crafts, folk costumes, Sami culture, weapons, toys, medicine and much more.